Android + IOIO + Countdown Timer

  

Countdown timer Android app with IOIO output. When the timer goes off, it pulls the pin high, or low.  The article demonstrates a proof of concept usage with a single LED, but this could easily be adapted for other usages: light switches and appliance control, detonators, etc.

For additional background information on interfacing Android with IOIO, check out my other introductory tutorials:

Android + IOIO + Simple Digital Output
Android + IOIO + Simple Digital Input
Android + IOIO + Simple Analog Output
Android + IOIO + Simple Analog Input

Background on Android development, IOIO, and electronics:

Meet IOIO
IOIO for Android Beginners Guide
IOIO Wiki
Android Developer’s Guide

 

Hardware

Parts needed:

  • Android Device (1.6+, 2.1 for Bluetooth)
  • IOIO (available at Sparkfun)
  • LED
  • 330 ohm resistor
  • Breadboard
  • Power supply
  • Hook-up wire

 

Assembly

For instructions and diagram, check out:  Android + IOIO + Simple Digital Output

 

Software

Get the source

With the circuit assembled, the next step is to get the demo application on the Android device. You can either download the pre-built .apk or checkout the source from Github:

git clone git://github.com/mitchtech/android_ioio_countdown_timer.git

If you are building from source, you will also need to import the IOIO Library project, and optionally the IOIO Bluetooth library projects, both available here:

git clone git://github.com/ytai/ioio.git

 

Install, connect, profit!

Finally, upload the app to the Android device (or browse to this page on the device and download the apk above). Connect the device to the IOIO, and start up the app.

Controlling other devices

Here’s an updated video using the same source code and essentially the same circuit (transistor controlled relay) to control a 12V fire alarm bell.

Android + IOIO + Range Finder

  

Ultrasonic and Infrared distance detection with Android and IOIO.  This article will demonstrate a basic proximity and ranging accessory for Android over USB (or Bluetooth).

For additional background information on interfacing Android with IOIO, check out my other introductory tutorials:

Android + IOIO + Simple Digital Output
Android + IOIO + Simple Digital Input
Android + IOIO + Simple Analog Output
Android + IOIO + Simple Analog Input

Background on Android development, IOIO, and electronics:

Meet IOIO
IOIO for Android Beginners Guide
IOIO Wiki
Android Developer’s Guide

 

Hardware

Parts needed:

  • Android Device (1.6+, 2.1 for Bluetooth)
  • IOIO (available at Sparkfun)
  • Ultrasonic Range Finder – Maxbotix LV-EZ1 (available at Sparkfun)
  • Infrared Proximity Sensor – Sharp GP2Y0A21YK (available at Sparkfun)
  • Breadboard
  • Power supply
  • Hook-up wire

 

Assembly

Connect the red, power lines of the sensors to +3.3v, the black ground line to GND, and the yellow signal lines to the desired desired analog input pin on the IOIO. The example uses pins 34 and 35, but can be used with other pins that support analog input (pins 31 – 46 on the IOIO). Here is a diagram of the completed circuit (created with Fritzing):

 

Software

Get the source

With the circuit assembled, the next step is to get the demo application on the Android device. You can either download the pre-built .apk or checkout the source from Github:

git clone git://github.com/mitchtech/android_ioio_range_finder.git

If you are building from source, you will also need to import the IOIO Library project, and optionally the IOIO Bluetooth library projects, both available here:

git clone git://github.com/ytai/ioio.git

 

Install, connect, profit!

Finally, upload the app to the Android device (or browse to this page on the device and download the apk above). Connect the device to the IOIO, and start up the app.

 

Android + IOIO + Breathalyzer

  

Proof of concept breathalyzer powered by Android and IOIO.  This article will demonstrate a basic alcohol gas detection device for Android over USB (or bluetooth).

For additional background information on interfacing Android with IOIO, check out my other introductory tutorials:

Android + IOIO + Simple Digital Output
Android + IOIO + Simple Digital Input
Android + IOIO + Simple Analog Output
Android + IOIO + Simple Analog Input

Background on Android development, IOIO, and electronics:

Meet IOIO
IOIO for Android Beginners Guide
IOIO Wiki
Android Developer’s Guide

 

Hardware

Parts needed:

  • Android Device (1.6+, 2.1 for Bluetooth)
  • IOIO (available at Sparkfun)
  • 330 ohm resistor
  • Alcohol Gas Sensor MQ-3 (available at Sparkfun)
  • Breadboard
  • Power supply
  • Hook-up wire

 

Assembly

Connect the red, power lines of the MQ-3 to +5v, the black ground line to GND, and the analog signal lines to the desired input pin. The example uses pins 34 but can be used with other pins that support analog input (pins 31 – 46 on the IOIO). Here is a diagram of the completed circuit (created with Fritzing):

 

Software

Get the source

With the circuit assembled, the next step is to get the demo application on the Android device. You can either download the pre-built .apk or checkout the source from Github:

git clone git://github.com/mitchtech/android_ioio_breathalyzer.git

If you are building from source, you will also need to import the IOIO Library project, and optionally the IOIO Bluetooth library projects, both available here:

git clone git://github.com/ytai/ioio.git

 

Install, connect, profit!

Finally, upload the app to the Android device (or browse to this page on the device and download the apk above). Connect the device to the IOIO, and start up the app.

 

Android + IOIO + Accelerometer Servos

  

A robotic gripper with wrist rotate controlled by Android on-board accelerometer.

For additional background information on interfacing Android with IOIO, check out my other introductory tutorials:

Android + IOIO + Simple Digital Output
Android + IOIO + Simple Digital Input
Android + IOIO + Simple Analog Output
Android + IOIO + Simple Analog Input

Background on Android development, IOIO, and electronics:

Meet IOIO
IOIO for Android Beginners Guide
IOIO Wiki
Android Developer’s Guide

 

Hardware

Parts needed:

  • Android Device (1.6+, 2.1 for Bluetooth)
  • IOIO (available at Sparkfun)
  • 2x Hobby servo
  • 2x 10k ohm resistors
  • Lynxmotion gripper (available at Robotshop)
  • Breadboard
  • Power supply
  • Hook-up wire

 

Assembly

Connect the red, power lines of the servos to +5v, the black ground lines to GND, and the yellow signal lines to the desired output pins, number 3 and 6 in the example below.  Other pins can be used as long as they support peripheral output (for PWM, marked with the letter ‘p’ on the back of the IOIO) AND are 5V tolerant (marked with a black circle around the pin). This leaves pins 3-7, and 10-14 as the only potentials.  Also, connect the same signal lines to +5V, with a 10k ohm resistor in series.  This allows use of the pins in 5V open drain mode, required since the IOIO operates with 3.3V. Here is a diagram of the completed circuit (created with Fritzing):

 

Software

Get the source

With the circuit assembled, the next step is to get the demo application on the Android device. You can either download the pre-built .apk or checkout the source from Github:

git clone git://github.com/mitchtech/android_ioio_accelerometer_servos.git

If you are building from source, you will also need to import the IOIO Library project, and optionally the IOIO Bluetooth library projects, both available here:

git clone git://github.com/ytai/ioio.git

 

Install, connect, profit!

Finally, upload the app to the Android device (or browse to this page on the device and download the apk above). Connect the device to the IOIO, and start up the app.

 

Android + IOIO + Combination Lock

  

A simple combination lock with IOIO and Android.  The fancy wheel scroller is based on the android-wheel widget from yuri kanivets.

For additional background information on interfacing Android with IOIO, check out my other introductory tutorials:

Android + IOIO + Simple Digital Output
Android + IOIO + Simple Digital Input
Android + IOIO + Simple Analog Output
Android + IOIO + Simple Analog Input

Background on Android development, IOIO, and electronics:

Meet IOIO
IOIO for Android Beginners Guide
IOIO Wiki
Android Developer’s Guide

 

Hardware

Parts needed:

  • Android Device (1.6+, 2.1 for Bluetooth)
  • IOIO (available at Sparkfun)
  • Hobby servo
  • 10k ohm resistors
  • Breadboard
  • Power supply
  • Hook-up wire

 

Assembly

Connect the red, power line of the servo to +5v, the black ground line to GND, and the yellow signal lines to the desired output pin, number 6 in the example below.  Other pins can be used as long as they support peripheral output (for PWM, marked with the letter ‘p’ on the back of the IOIO) AND are 5V tolerant (marked with a black circle around the pin). This leaves pins 3-7, and 10-14 as the only potentials.  Also, connect the same signal lines to +5V, with a 10k ohm resistor in series.  This allows use of the pins in 5V open drain mode, required since the IOIO operates with 3.3V. Here is a diagram of the completed circuit (created with Fritzing):

 

Software

Get the source

With the circuit assembled, the next step is to get the demo application on the Android device. You can either download the pre-built .apk or checkout the source from Github:

git clone git://github.com/mitchtech/android_ioio_combination_lock.git

If you are building from source, you will also need to import the IOIO Library project, and optionally the IOIO Bluetooth library projects, both available here:

git clone git://github.com/ytai/ioio.git

 

Install, connect, profit!

Finally, upload the app to the Android device (or browse to this page on the device and download the apk above). Connect the device to the IOIO, and start up the app.

 

Android + IOIO + Software Joystick Servos

  

Android and IOIO powered pan and tilt servo bracket controlled by software joystick.

For additional background information on interfacing Android with IOIO, check out my other introductory tutorials:

Android + IOIO + Simple Digital Output
Android + IOIO + Simple Digital Input
Android + IOIO + Simple Analog Output
Android + IOIO + Simple Analog Input

Background on Android development, IOIO, and electronics:

Meet IOIO
IOIO for Android Beginners Guide
IOIO Wiki
Android Developer’s Guide

 

Hardware

Parts needed:

  • Android Device (1.6+, 2.1 for Bluetooth)
  • IOIO (available at Sparkfun)
  • 2x Hobby servo
  • 2x 10k ohm resistors
  • Breadboard
  • Power supply
  • Hook-up wire

 

Assembly

Connect the red, power lines of the servos to +5v, the black ground lines to GND, and the yellow signal lines to the desired output pins, number 3 and 6 in the example below.  Other pins can be used as long as they support peripheral output (for PWM, marked with the letter ‘p’ on the back of the IOIO) AND are 5V tolerant (marked with a black circle around the pin). This leaves pins 3-7, and 10-14 as the only potentials.  Also, connect the same signal lines to +5V, with a 10k ohm resistor in series.  This allows use of the pins in 5V open drain mode, required since the IOIO operates with 3.3V. Here is a diagram of the completed circuit (created with Fritzing):

 

Software

Get the source

With the circuit assembled, the next step is to get the demo application on the Android device. You can either download the pre-built .apk or checkout the source from Github:

git clone git://github.com/mitchtech/android_ioio_software_joystick.git

If you are building from source, you will also need to import the IOIO Library project, and optionally the IOIO Bluetooth library projects, both available here:

git clone git://github.com/ytai/ioio.git

 

Install, connect, profit!

Finally, upload the app to the Android device (or browse to this page on the device and download the apk above). Connect the device to the IOIO, and start up the app.